Fayette Fest

The Kentucky Sire Stakes

Premier harness racing with over $2M in purses, live music, shopping, food trucks,
beer garden, kid activities, equine education, dog events & contests and KY Proud Market

FREE ADMISSION
The Red Mile
Noon until 6pm
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Fayette Fest

The Kentucky Sire Stakes

Premier harness racing with over $2M in purses, live music, shopping, food trucks,
beer garden, kid activities, equine education, dog events & contests and KY Proud Market

FREE ADMISSION
The Red Mile
Noon until 6pm
Sunday, September 15, 2019

bottom-racing

Kentucky Sire Stakes Championships

The Kentucky Sire Stakes is a culmination of a month-long series of preliminary Standardbred races, with the biggest annual money earners getting a chance to compete in one of the richest racing finals in North America.

The Kentucky Sire Stakes Championships is funded, in part, by a portion of the sales tax paid when breeding a stallion to a mare in Kentucky, as well as by a portion of the pari-mutuel tax paid by Kentucky racetracks. These funds and others are administered by the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission in its efforts to ensure the strength and continuing growth of the horse industry in Kentucky.

PAST WINNERS

LEARN MORE at the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission - khrc.ky.gov

The Red Mile

Since September 1875, the Red Mile has been an important part of the cultural and physical fabric of Lexington, central Kentucky, and the world of horse racing. Originally founded by the Kentucky Trotting Horse Breeders Association, The Red Mile is the second-oldest harness racing track in the world, and one of harness racing’s most famous tracks.

Named “The Red Mile” because of its one mile oval red clay surface, and home to the iconic Floral Hall (the round barn), since 1893 this historic track has annually hosted one of the legs of the Triple Crown of Harness Racing for Trotters – the Kentucky Futurity.

red mile
bottom red barn

Floral Hall

Floral Hall is one of Lexington's most-photographed landmarks.

During the past 130 years, the octagon-shaped building on Red Mile Road just off South Broadway has housed gardeners and gamblers, doughboys and some of America's best trotting horses.

John McMurtry, a noted 19th-century Lexington architect and builder, designed and constructed Floral Hall in 1880-82. It was commissioned by the Kentucky Agricultural & Mechanical Association to serve as a floral exhibition hall for what was then the local fairgrounds.

Lexington's fairgrounds had been at Maxwell Spring on what is now the University of Kentucky campus, but it was heavily damaged by Union troops during the Civil War. After the war, the federal government paid the association $25,000 in damages. The money was used to buy new fairgrounds land where The Red Mile is now, and $5,000 went toward Floral Hall's construction.

Fayette Fest